Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Pyrrhuloxia

1. Pyrrhuloxia male Pyrrhuloxia Cardinalis sinuatus 1-29-09

Pyrrhuloxias, also know as Mexican Cardinals, are seen in Sycamore Canyon year round. They are distinguished from the similar looking Northern Cardinals by their gray coloration and stubby yellow parrot-like beaks.

2. Pyrrhuloxia The Male Pyrrhuloxia has red around its beak and eyes as well as a red crest and red running down the belly.  The female is almost all gray with little to no red except in the crest, wings, and tail feathers. She also has a stubby yellow beak while Northern Cardinals have a red cone-shaped beak.  The female cardinal is over-all brown and not gray. Female pyrrhuloxias are very shy and often only come to my feeders at dusk and dawn.

3. May 16, 2008 eLike their Northern counterparts, Pyrrhuloxias are seed eaters. They love peanuts and sunflower seed and will also come to suet in the winter time.

4. Pyrrhuloxia 6-11-07 Male Pyrrhuloxia 6-11-07

5. Juvenile male pyrrhuloxia This juvenile male is already starting to get the red around its eyes and on its wings. Though still downy, you can see the beginning of the red on its belly. It already has the yellow beak of an adult.

6. Juvenile pyrrhuloxia 7-20-10 However, this juvenile (7-20-10) still has the gray beak of a nestling. However, you can still see that distinctive stubby beak shape.

7. Pyrrhuloxia 7-5-10

Juvenile Pyrrhuloxia 7-5-10

 8. May 16, 2008 k

When seen from the front the pyrrhuloxia takes on a comical, cone-shaped silhouette. This picture was taken May 16, 2008 in my own yard on Vermillion Sunset Dr.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Pyrrhuloxia_0121 However, they can relax their crests and often do. 7-5-10

Pyrrhuloxia sightings in My Yard (1st sighting of each month only
Vermillion Sunset Dr July 18, 2007
  January 31, 2008
  February 15, 2008
  May 1, 2008
  June 25, 2008
  October 4, 2008
  November 27, 2008
  January 29, 2009
  March 3, 2009
  April 1, 2009
  June 10, 2009
  September 19, 2009
  November 9, 2009
  December 5, 2009
  January 1, 2010
  February 13, 2010
  April 1, 2010
  June 21, 2010
  July 1, 2010

 

10. Pyrrhuloxia_0125 Juvenile Pyrrhuloxia 7-5-10

Pyrrhuloxia sightings in Sycamore Canyon
Location: Date:
Harrison Rd May 3, 2007
  March 18, 2008
  February 13, 2010
Sienna Bluffs Trail February 24, 2009
  March 6, 2009
  June 11, 2009
  March 3, 2010
  May 20, 2010
  July 14, 2010
Sycamore Canyon Neighborhood Streets* March 4, 2009
June 11, 2009
Sycamore Canyon Park August 4, 2009
  September 4, 2009
  February 12, 2010
  June 30, 2010
Azure sky Trail January 27, 2009

*I have defined this area as the junction of Rustling Leaf Trail and Sycamore Leaf  in all directions for about 1/4 to 1/2 mile.

11. Sycamore Canyon Wash 2-16-2009 Adult Male Pyrrhuloxia in Sycamore Canyon Wash 2-16-09

12. Sycamore Canyon Wash 2-16-09

Location: Date Seen:
Sycamore Canyon Wash April 15, 2008
  April 23, 2008
  May 10, 2008
  June 14, 2008
  January 29, 2009
  February 16, 2009
  March 24, 2009
  July 29, 2009
  September 25, 2009
  December 27, 2009
  March 4, 2010
  April 13, 2010

As you can see, Pyrrhuloxias can be seen practically anywhere in Sycamore Canyon at anytime of year. All data for these sightings comes from my eBird record with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

51 comments:

  1. I think this little fellow has an Ed Grimley thing going on there Kathie ;) Lovely photos and all joking aside he's a sweet little bird and I enjoyed learning about him. Thanks! Heading for Seattle in a couple of days so I am hoping to come back with some bird photos of ones that I wouldn't normally see around here. I will be keeping my fingers crossed.
    An English Girl Rambles

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  2. Denise, glad to see you stop by! I am glad you enjoyed this post though I have no idea who Ed Grimly is. I will have to look him up. I hope you have fun in Seattle! I really hope you get to see some good birds! There is an excellent wildlife refuge nearby called Nisqually. I visited there back in 2007 and saw so many new birds! It's just south of Tacoma.

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  3. Wonderful images of a very interesting bird!

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  4. Your photos are incredible. Thank you for this post. Wow!

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  5. Thank you for introducing this beautiful bird to me on my first visit in AZ. I will miss my winter visits.

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  6. Sandy, well thank you! It was a lot of work but well worth it.

    Katnell, ME Too!

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  7. Fantastic Pyrrhuloxia shots! A favorite beauty in the desert.

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  8. Some great images. I've yet to meet this bird and it was fun to get a better look at its appearance and behavior through you images. Now, if I can just figure out how to pronounce the name!

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  9. Donna, you are so right!

    Vicki, It is difficult but kinda fun once you get the hang of it.

    Tim, thank you!

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  10. Neat post! I think they take a little to get used to. Then once you get the idea they are quite beautiful as well as exotic in their own way.

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  11. Troutbirder, you are so right. I enjoy them so much. I love that parrot-like beak they have.

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  12. you are invited to follow my blog

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  13. what lovely photos, they look like birds with a lot of character!

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  14. Beautiful Pyrrhuloxia photos, they are beautiful birds.

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  15. The crests are so funny on the young birds. Maybe I'll dress up as a Pyrrhuloxia for Halloween! -Excellent photos!

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  16. I never saw these before. Looks like they are molting.

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    1. Abe, some are and some are just the way they look!

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  17. what lovely photos, they look such characterful birds!

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  18. Really wonderful photos a bird too interesting congratulations from Spain

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  19. Your site is awesome. I have added it to my favourite links on my page. Thanks for sharing somuch knowledge and beauty.

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  20. Really fantastic shots. I have yet to get a decent pyrrhuloxia image. Impressive.

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    1. Kim, it is easier when they are yard birds!

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  21. Hi there - what a great bird - it really does have some good hair going there!

    The way the crest sticks up is a bit like our Crested Pigeon - although the birds are clearly not related.

    Cheers Stewart M - Australia

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    1. Stewart, they are our Mexican Cardinal. I love their spiky crest!

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  22. taht´s a beautiful bird and very interesting post. You managed to get great shots too.

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  23. This bird looks like parrot, I mean the size, nice shot, I love it.

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    1. Seow wei, they have a parrot-like beak!

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  24. This bird also visits our yard! I thought at first it was a cardinal, then realized it wasn't. I posted about him once also. You got some great pictures! (Of the baby quail too!)

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    1. Marie, thank you. I am glad it comes to your yard as well and that you figured it out!

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  25. Oh my gush these bird is so pretty!!

    SWF

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  26. So much iformation there Kathie, plus wonderful portraits.

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    1. Thank you Phil! Sorry it has taken me so long to respond! We did a major move last year and I have been so busy writing my other blog.

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  27. what an exotic and colorful bird to have in your collection there!!love the beak and the crest...color pattern is unusual too. You got some close ups...good job!! cheers.

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    1. Island Rambles, this is one of my favorite desert species!

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  28. you are invited to follow my blog

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  29. Hello friend!. . .. Beautiful pictures of this lovely bird ... Cheers ..

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    1. Thank you Ana. You website is very beautiful as well!

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